CaesarNovus

Greek language on deathwatch?

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http://www.wsj.com/articles/what-the-world-will-speak-in-2115-1420234648- projects what languages the world will speak 100 years from now... based on history. Say goodbye to languages of small populations, like Greek (hopefully not elegant Italian!). The bigger languages will become streamlined, such as losing hard to learn quirks like giving genders to inanimate objects. Mandarin won't spread because it is harder for adults to learn than even Greek:

if the Chinese rule the world, they will likely do so in English.

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I haven't read the article (lack of time), but my experience from living in Athens is that the Greek language is living very dangerously at the moment. The big issue is that people do not only use English a lot, but that the Latin alphabet is becoming ever more dominant - it is everywhere in the form of graffiti and it is constantly used when texting on phones. It seems to me, that a lot of people simply find the Latin alphabet easier to use by some reason. 


 


I would not be surprised if it's all but gone rather sooner than 100 years.


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I definitely agree what they say with regard to Chinese. I keep hearing the justification for children here in the UK learning Chinese is that 'X amount of people speak Chinese' yet that number, I imagine, includes a large percentage who will never leave their home town let alone China itself. The percentage of businessmen who we might have contact with would be very low and chances are they, as noted by the WSJ would speak English.

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Don't forget about the Tower of Babel ....

 

And for the use of another alphabet while texting: That's another kind of language to start with.
Using streettalk and abbreviations.

 

Expect we don't use texting in short messages in a couple of years. It's to short and confusing (see Babel)
that at the end no one understands the message nor it's context includes any useful information. So you
have to send a lot messages to understand what's going on. Or it's referring to anonther text, news, common
knowledge or a picture. So, most of it has no additional value, just a statement.

Or it's about people being late for an appointment ....

 

So, back to the extinction of different languages ...

 


 

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Don't forget about the Tower of Babel ....

 

And for the use of another alphabet while texting: That's another kind of language to start with.

Using streettalk and abbreviations.

 

Expect we don't use texting in short messages in a couple of years. It's to short and confusing (see Babel)

that at the end no one understands the message nor it's context includes any useful information. So you

have to send a lot messages to understand what's going on. Or it's referring to anonther text, news, common

knowledge or a picture. So, most of it has no additional value, just a statement.

Or it's about people being late for an appointment ....

 

So, back to the extinction of different languages ...

That is so true, but even more so too many people speak only from their own context, even when the speaker can't possibly know what it is. Not just rarified professionals, but also everyday people. In the States many people have been lead into being functional illiterates by the dogmas of multiculturalism, and the belief that self censorship and editing is contrary to the ideals of free speech.

Auris Arrectibus likes this

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I believe there are still some Greek speakers in southern Italy, a remnant of the once vast Greek-speaking community there. Has anyone been to that region?


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I believe there are still some Greek speakers in southern Italy, a remnant of the once vast Greek-speaking community there. Has anyone been to that region?

 

I've been there quite a lot and not met any Greek speakers - but I've read that some still spoke Greek there pre Mussolini. 

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I haven't read the article (lack of time), but my experience from living in Athens is that the Greek language is living very dangerously at the moment. The big issue is that people do not only use English a lot, but that the Latin alphabet is becoming ever more dominant - it is everywhere in the form of graffiti and it is constantly used when texting on phones. It seems to me, that a lot of people simply find the Latin alphabet easier to use by some reason. 

 

I would not be surprised if it's all but gone rather sooner than 100 years.

 

That's very sad news. Hopefully we will see a resurgence of interest among Greeks in their language and literature in the near future. I think it's bound to happen when they realise how much their language is in decline, as they are a very proud people. Hopefully this resurgence won't manifest itself in aggressive nationalism, but rather in a renewed interest and enthusiasm.

 

If I was a cleverer person I'd put in the effort to learn Greek, especially Classical Greek, as it sound melodious and beautiful.

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I've been there quite a lot and not met any Greek speakers - but I've read that some still spoke Greek there pre Mussolini. 

 

Sorry to divert the thread slightly but I figured everyone would find this interesting. Apparently there are 80,000 Greek speakers left in two regions of southern Italy. Greek there is rapidly disappearing:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Griko_people

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Sorry to divert the thread slightly but I figured everyone would find this interesting. Apparently there are 80,000 Greek speakers left in two regions of southern Italy. Greek there is rapidly disappearing:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Griko_people

 

Wow and I never heard even a  word of Greek in southern Italy! Amazing! Thanks a lot, that is real good to know!

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I've seen and heard them on the ferry from Brindisi to Patras. They look more Greek than the Greeks sometimes, and they speak both Italian and Greek (an older form) with perfect accents.

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