Klingan

Roman cooking

25 posts in this topic

Eupheresthai mentioned that he had tried some ancient recipes. Has anyone else here experimented with Roman food? Was it good? How did you get around the very original ingredients? Was it difficult to make? I would love to make a full Roman dinner at some point and all input would be greatly appreciated! 


Eupheresthai likes this

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Thanks a lot for the link! I'll have a look at it tonight when I get back home! :)


 


The Garum is a bit weird, but I've heard that pretty much any thai fish sauce will be a decent alternative which is fairly close to the real thing (as far as we understand). I will have to start looking for recipes.  


Eupheresthai likes this

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There are six episodes in all of the Supersizers in Ancient Rome. Each episode lists two or sometimes three menus and take you into the kitchen where the food items are prepared.  Yes, you have to sit through the other but I still laugh so hard at some of their comments.  There is even a big crock of garum. Unfortunately when "Roman sauce(other than garum)" is mentioned, they really don't tell you what is in that. The cook admits that very little in way of ingredient amounts has ever been recorded thus she has to guess.


 


The door mice segment is sad. :(  Poor little things.


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I really want do do the mice thing, but without the mice, and have therefore been thinking about possible supplements. I mean, what the heck taste like mice?


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Chicken?  doesn't everything taste like chicken?


 


Try Mark Grant's  'Roman Cookery'.   I love reading the recipes.... now if I could find some one to make or cook them...........


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People eat all sorts of rotted things, cheese for instance, and wine. The Frugal Gourmet has a good book on ancient cooking, and there is also another which has translations of one Roman cookbook. Unfortunately, none of the processes are described, and cooking is as much about process as ingredients. Many of the recipes which have survived are complex and exotic banquet dishes. Poor and middle class people probably had a very pleasant cuisine, not unlike the traditional dishes of Sicily and Southern Italy before the opening of the Americas.

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Come to think of it, like Artimi suggests you might use chicken in place of your mice. Perhaps get creative with ground chicken and mold it into mouse shapes? deep fry, use rice for claws. Or how about rabbit and say they are gigantic rats? :P


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I do Roman cooking regularly, esp. when we are at any events we try to eat authentic food. But also at home either for me or also for friends.


 


I love doing moretum and carry that to every barbeque party I'm invited to, much better than the usual tzatziki or potatoe salad. ;-)


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Can you give me some advice on what's doable/eatable Medusa? I'm planning my Roman dinner later in two or three weeks (depending on when my guests can come).


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What is moretum??

It's (sheep) cheese or similar with herbs and spices, vinegar and oil. There are as many variations of this recipe than there are cooks.

 

Can you give me some advice on what's doable/eatable Medusa? I'm planning my Roman dinner later in two or three weeks (depending on when my guests can come).

 

Here's one website in English on Roman cooking:

http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~mjw/recipes/ethnic/historical/ant-rom-coll.html

 

Also I could recommend the book

http://www.amazon.de/The-Classical-Cookbook-Andrew-Dalby/dp/0892363940

which contains Greek and Roman recipes.

 

Unfortunately all other recipe books I have are in German (I know of one which has been translated into Italian but don't know about English).

Dermot C and Eupheresthai like this

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Thanks a lot for the website, it seems great! Actually, books in German is nor issue at all, I am more or less fluent. 


 


I'll let you guys know how my cooking experiments went as soon as I am done with them :)


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I've drank 'Celtic' mead before and ate some Iron Age style bread supplied by a Celtic re-enactment group many, many years ago as a child. Other than that I haven't tried anything else. I've gotten hold of Sally Grainger's and Andrew Dalby's  The Classical Cookbook a while ago, but I'm too much of a bad cook to attempt many of the recipes in it.


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For Klingan and all others who can read German here the German Roman cooking books I have:


 


Hans Peter von Peschke / Werner Feldmann


"Kochbuch der Alten Römer"


ISBN 3-491-96075-4


(In Italy I saw this in an Italian translation)


 


Edgar Comes


"Römer Kochbuch"


ISBN 978-3-86738-028-7


(Edgar is head of the Milites Bedenses www.milites-bedenses.de)


 


Christian Eckert


"Gladiatoren Kochbuch"


ISBN 9-783788-816339


(Christian was involved in the gladiator experiment of the University of Regensburg and his recipe book contains modern recipes based on the Ancient diet of gladiators)


Klingan, Eupheresthai and Bad Admin like this

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Hi Klingan,


 


A few years ago I visited the site of Glanum in the Provence, France.


Nice little restaurant at that site, where they serve "roman dishes". Pretty nice.


- video: http://www.kewego.nl/video/iLyROoafJNnt.html


- website: taberna romana


 


Maybe these websites with recipes could inspire you:


- http://susannaduffy.hubpages.com/hub/ancient-food-rome


- http://pass-the-garum.blogspot.nl/


- http://www.coquinaria.nl/english/recipes/02.6histrecept.htm


 


Still, everytime I order vitello tonnato in a Italian restaurant, I'm sure it's a dish


with a tuna-sauce that evolved over dthe centuries from roman garum.


Recipe in english: http://uktv.co.uk/food/recipe/aid/590653


 


Don't hesitate to invite me for your dinner-party!


Do I have to bring my own cochlearium?


 


Auris Arrectibus

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The trendy British cook Heston Blumenthal also made a documentary about Roman food, although he seems to have used Trimalchio's Feast scene from Petronius's Satyricon as his main inspiration rather than the writings of Apicius . I caught some of this when it was first aired on TV, but there's only some clips of it on the internet now:


 


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LIJu-bzMGiw


 


It looks interesting enough, although its accuracy is debatable - Caligula in the first century BC?


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There's an excellent book on the topic:


 


The Roman Cookery of Apicius. Translated and adapted for the modern kitchen by John Edwards (1990). ISBN 0 7126 2556 9


 


Apart from the letters from Vindolanda, it has to be one of the most interesting reads on things Roman, and not only includes recipes but also gives menus actually used for ancient meals and feasts and a discussion on food and culinary supplies in the Roman Empire.


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